Gridwire Protects Fish Processing Facility

An historic building in a busy fishing port had an infestation of gulls on its roof. Hundreds, even thousands of birds would loaf on the flat roof and create a massive mess of droppings, feathers, and fish bones. Clearly a significant effort was required to resolve this problem.

The facility’s owners wanted a long-term solution, that did not need regular care or maintenance. They worked with the installer and settled upon Gridwire, an overhead network of wires positioned in a grid that keeps gulls from landing on the roof.

Gridwire systems will deny gulls and other sea birds access to large open areas. It is a system of poles, cables and wires installed so that wires make up large squares or rectangles, like a very large mesh net. It can be suspended in various horizontal and vertical patterns.

Gulls, whose eye site is not great, blurrily see the wires as they approach the roof and become nervous; they fear becoming trapped in a zone they don’t understand.

Gridwire is typically installed 6-8 feet above a flat roof, allowing workers to access the roof as they normally would. It is a humane solution; even if the gulls fly into the zone, they can’t be hurt by the wires, and can easily escape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bird Barrier offers two versions of wire; Gridwire or Florescent GridTwine, which is more visible to birds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The response from the gulls was dramatic. They flew around the roof trying to figure out what had changed. Fortunately for the building’s owners, they settled on surrounding buildings; they fish processing facility was finally gull free.

Bird Barrier provides long lasting, humane bird deterrent products to solve any structural bird problem. The company works with hundreds of Certified Installers around the world. Learn more at www.birdbarrier.com or give us a call at 800-503-5444.

Gridwire can solve a seagull problem

Summer represents hot weather and the beach. When the beach comes to mind, we can’t help but think about those birds that hang out on the sand, seagulls.

Gulls have the ability to drink both saltwater and freshwater, thanks to their salt removing glands. They are also considered to be scavengers as they will eat everything from dead fish and garbage to field mice and insects. Not only are they good swimmers, but they can also walk and run on land. Seagulls are also protected on the federal, state and local levels.

Gulls are particularly a nuisance in coastal areas, dump sites, piers and harbors. Like geese, they can create hazardous conditions to low flying aircraft. Their droppings contain uric acid which prove to cause structural damage. That is not all as their droppings can also pose a health risk.

So, how do you get rid of the problems these intelligent birds create?

You can protect lakes, parking lots, warehouse roofs, etc. from gulls, geese, and other large aquatic birds. Gridwire systems will deny birds access to large open areas. It is a system of poles, cables and wires installed so that wires make up large squares of rectangles, like a very large mesh net. It can be suspended in various horizontal and vertical patterns;

Gridwire5gridwire4

How it works: Gulls see the wires as they approach the roof and become nervous; they are scared of becoming trapped in a zone they don’t understand.

Gridwire is typically installed 6-8 feet above a large flat roof. It is a humane solution; even if the gulls fly into the zone, they can’t be hurt by the wires, and can easily escape.

Bird Barrier offers two versions of wire; Gridwire or Florescent GridTwine, which is more visible to birds.

Don’t let seagulls ruin your summer! At Bird Barrier, we are eager to help you with any of your bird problems. Please give us a call at 800-503-5444 or visit our website.

Seagulls in the winter?

With the cold weather approaching, you would think all birds would be flying south. Unfortunately, for a townhouse complex in Tinton Falls, New Jersey, hundreds, if not thousands of seagulls are flocking to the rooftops of the development. The town recently held a meeting to discuss the situation and how to resolve it.

“At least 25 residents came out to the Tinton Falls Borough Council meeting on Tuesday to relay to officials the scary details of trying to live their lives surrounded by the feathered interlopers, which includes feces-covered cars, patios and furniture and children unable to play outside,” reported Amy Brynes from the Eatontown-Tinton Falls Patch.

The situation has become so severe that the odor permeating from the bird droppings has caused the residents to shut their windows. The main source of the the seagull’s stay is the neighboring landfill and the Monmouth Regional Health Commission is doing everything they can to eliminate any type of food source.

“In a natural environment they are wonderful things,” a resident said of the gulls, “Here, they present a health hazard.”

Check out the article here!

Attack of the 100 Foot Seagull

MSN9news reported that “giant” seagull invaded the studios of Channel 9 six o’clock news in Melbourne. The veteran newscaster, Peter Hitchner, was reading a story about a 1982 murder, when a “giant” seagull walked across the projection behind Hitchner, ultimately caused by a camera shooting a real-time cityscape of Melbourne. Hitchner, unphased by the seagull’s antics, continued his report.

“I was reading away, and it was a serious story, and I suddenly thought, ‘Oh my gosh that seagull’s back again’, because we had bit of a problem last night,” he told Melbourne radio after the bulletin.

“About 50 seconds to six o’clock this seagull arrived and started pecking at the camera and it had the beadiest huge eyes you’ve ever seen in your life.”