Bird Barrier’s StealthNet, Bird-Shock Flex-Track and Birdwire Protect a High-End Health Club.

At a four-story fitness center in Southern California, birds had found their comfort zone. Seagulls and pigeons were firmly entrenched on structural windscreens, under HVAC equipment, and in nooks and crannies on the roof. All of which was next to both a basketball court and a pool area.

Due to its proximity to club members, the risk associated with the bacteria found in bird droppings was a serious concern. In addition, the mess was clogging drains allowing 2 to 3 inches of water to accumulate on the flat roof.

StealthNet was chosen to close off the open air space above the HVAC equipment. The netting was attached horizontally at the same height as the windscreens, and support cables were strung under the netting every 25 feet to support the large span. This solution prevented the pigeons from flying in. In all about 17,000 square feet of netting was installed.

To the left, an attractive pool area. To the right, Stealth-Net tensioned over the entire roof area keeps pest birds from the HVAC equipment.

StealthNet and support cables are attached to the top of the chain link fence surrounding the basketball court.

The biggest challenge was hundreds of small openings that ran underneath the basketball court, allowing birds to re-enter the supposedly bird-free zone. Each one had to be blocked off. “We learned that pigeons are very determined,” said John Gran, the installer.

 

 

 

 

The tops of the windscreens were treated with a single row of Bird-Shock Flex-Track powered by a single solar charger.


Teak windscreens surround the pool area. Birds landing on the tops of these screens caused an unsightly mess for sunbathers. Birdwire Gutter Clamps were secured every five feet, and Birdwire was spring tensioned in between. This was an attractive and effective way to protect a narrow ridge. Birdwire Gutter Clamps secured Birdwire every 5 feet.

 

 

 

 

 

Effective bird control depends not only on the right products but on proper installation techniques as well. Bird Barrier’s technical experts provide information by phone at 800-503-5444, or email us at customercare@birdbarrier.com or visit our website.

 

 

Who Can You Call? Bird Barrier!

Want help with a purchase, need to clarify an order, find out about a delivery estimate, or even get expert bird advice?

Call Amanda Siravo or Diana Lomeli, two of Bird Barrier’s outstanding customer service/sales representatives at the Carson, California Bird Barrier office.

You can ask Amanda and Diana questions starting at 7am each morning. They advise Bird Barrier customers before, during, and after a purchase. Their daily goal is to exceed customers’ expectations, and she routinely does. They understand birds, bird deterrent products, purchasing, catalog information, order tracking, and technical support. No wonder customers love them.

Amanda and Diana are especially knowledgeable about woodpeckers. They know woodpeckers are some of the most difficult bird species to deter, so they assist customers in understanding the different woodpecker-specific products such as Bird Barrier’s spray deterrent and paint/stain additive. They explain that combining products is often necessary when trying to rid the pesky peckers.  When Amanda and Diana offer expertise, customers feel confident with their purchase.

Amanda and Diana want customers to know: Bird Barrier values their business. So, they often go above and beyond their usual daily responsibilities. Bird Barrier customers appreciate that they will perform quickly and accurately. They are efficient, knowledgeable, and courteous, they say.

You can reach Amanda and Diana, or any of our dedicated customer service representatives, at 800-503-5444.

 

 

 

Calling all bird counters and a gang of turkeys

Bird Census

2010 is a great year for statisticians and bird lovers. April 1st is National Census Day and February 13 is the Great Backyard Bird Count. That’s right, it’s a census for birds. The National Audubon Society is holding a bird count and they’re counting on the public to help.

“Anyone can take part in the Great Backyard Bird Count, from novice bird watchers to experts. Participants count birds for as little as 15 minutes (or as long as they wish) on one or more days of the event and report their sightings online at www.birdcount.org.”

The national count will begin on On February 13 at 10:30 a.m. Great Backyard Bird Count

Gang of Turkeys

“Gang of turkeys terrorizes Athens neighborhood” is the title to an interesting article from the Augusta Chronicle about two highly aggressive turkeys attacking people in a small neighborhood. Wild turkeys are very cautious birds and will flee from any harmful situation, especially situations involving humans. Yet these turkeys seemed determined and fearless because they went from lawn to lawn charging at humans yielding anything from brooms to pool sticks. This gang of turkeys were unfortunately put down by the Department of Natural Resources. Gang of turkeys article

Bird Baby

A couple of weeks ago I posted a link to an article that compared the behavior of birds to schools of fish. The article that was referenced stated that birds change direction simultaneously as if they were communicating to evade predators. This week I found a very interesting photo of what a “school of birds” created.

Link to full story: Birds flock together to create big baby in the sky