No More Droppings Down the Chimney Thanks to Bird-Shock

Beige Flex-Track blends almost perfectly

The end result as can be clearly seen in these photos is a professional, low-profile application. And the best result is that the birds left the site entirely.

The owner of a large residence with five chimneys wanted an invisible solution to their bird problem. Birds were perching on the edges of the chimneys and making a mess down the sides. The installer showed the homeowner Bird Barrier’s Bird-Shock Flex-Track and Dura-Spike. Each product had its advantages: Bird-Shock would be invisible from the ground, but would require lots of wiring between the chimneys. Dura-Spike would not require any wiring, but could be seen from the ground. The installer set sample pieces of each product up and allowed the homeowner to choose. They chose Bird-Shock Flex-Track.

Beige Flex-Track blends almost perfectly
Beige Flex-Track blends almost perfectly with the chimneys.

Flex-Track is almost invisible from just a few feet away.
Flex-Track is almost invisible from just a few feet away.
The five chimneys needed less than 20 feet of track each. Bird-Shock Flex-Track’s versatile composition allows it to curve or be cut to make corners, as was needed for the square chimneys. Due to the size and layout of the house, it required several hundred feet of lead wire to connect them all together. The installer tucked the wire under roof shingles and zip-tied it to the structure whenever possible. He chose beige, one of Flex-Track’s five available colors to blend with the color of the chimneys.

Lead-Out Wire is secured to pipes between the chimneys.
Lead-Out Wire is secured to pipes between the chimneys.

Lead-Out Wire is tucked under roof tiles to be out of sight.
Lead-Out Wire is tucked under roof tiles to be out of sight.

Bird Nest Causes Chimney Fire

The pjstar reported that a bird’s nest caused an estimated $20,000 damage to a North Peoria home after igniting inside the flue of the chimney. According to the report, most of the fire was contained to the area of the fireplace, with minor damage to the attic of the home. “A bird’s nest located around the firebox and flue area appeared to have been ignited by the heat of a fire in the fireplace, then spread flames to the area around the chimney.”

Central County Fire & Rescue warn home owners about the potential fire hazards of abandoned bird nests in chimney flues.

“Bird nests in the chimney flue can ignite and extend to the rest of your house. In the spring, birds build nests up in high places; trees, utility poles, houses and, of course, chimney flues. The eggs hatch and the birds abandon the nest through the summer. During the first cold snap in the fall, everyone lights up the first fire of the season. If the flue has not been checked, a hot ember can be carried up the thermal column in the flue and land in the flammable nesting material. The burning nest can either burn out harmlessly or fall onto your roof or into the combustible chase, or through an opening in your attic, causing a major fire.”

It is important to have your chimney flue checked prior to the first ignition of your fireplace for the winter season. In order to prevent birds from roosting and nesting in your fireplace throughout the year, bird deterrents may be a viable option. For a complete listing of humane bird repellents, please visit Bird Barrier America.