Gridwire can solve a seagull problem

Summer represents hot weather and the beach. When the beach comes to mind, we can’t help but think about those birds that hang out on the sand, seagulls.

Gulls have the ability to drink both saltwater and freshwater, thanks to their salt removing glands. They are also considered to be scavengers as they will eat everything from dead fish and garbage to field mice and insects. Not only are they good swimmers, but they can also walk and run on land. Seagulls are also protected on the federal, state and local levels.

Gulls are particularly a nuisance in coastal areas, dump sites, piers and harbors. Like geese, they can create hazardous conditions to low flying aircraft. Their droppings contain uric acid which prove to cause structural damage. That is not all as their droppings can also pose a health risk.

So, how do you get rid of the problems these intelligent birds create?

You can protect lakes, parking lots, warehouse roofs, etc. from gulls, geese, and other large aquatic birds. Gridwire systems will deny birds access to large open areas. It is a system of poles, cables and wires installed so that wires make up large squares of rectangles, like a very large mesh net. It can be suspended in various horizontal and vertical patterns;

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How it works: Gulls see the wires as they approach the roof and become nervous; they are scared of becoming trapped in a zone they don’t understand.

Gridwire is typically installed 6-8 feet above a large flat roof. It is a humane solution; even if the gulls fly into the zone, they can’t be hurt by the wires, and can easily escape.

Bird Barrier offers two versions of wire; Gridwire or Florescent GridTwine, which is more visible to birds.

Don’t let seagulls ruin your summer! At Bird Barrier, we are eager to help you with any of your bird problems. Please give us a call at 800-503-5444 or visit our website.

Installer Goes The Extra (Five) Miles With Dura-Spike Bird Spike

One of Bird Barrier’s factory-certified professional installers sent in these photos of a recent job in an industrial warehouse. Pigeons were perching in the piping and conduit running the length and breadth of a large warehouse. Factoring the size of the building, an exclusion strategy was a logistical nightmare and prohibitively expensive for the client. Instead, the installer used Bird Barrier’s all-stainless steel Dura-Spike bird spike to remove all the available overhead perching areas. The entire project used over five miles (eight kilometers) of spike and Bird Barrier Bond industrial adhesive. The pigeons have since left the building and are looking for another, less pointed, roosting area.

Don’t Look Up!

In Jonesborough, Tennessee, the old Washington County courthouse is being plagued by none other than pigeons…and lots of them.

There are about 150-200 pigeons perching above the courthouse. Recently, the situation with the droppings has increasingly become worse, leaving the county to take steps of prevention.

“If this keeps on, somebody’s going to get sick,” said Jake Hensley, Washington County courthouse maintenance director.

The county has suffered with the pigeons and their droppings for nearly two decades. However, without effective bird control, the situation turned into a dangerous one.

Bird Barrier offers various products to help get rid of these birds such as Bird-Shock Flex Track, Bird Spikes, OvoControl, Avihaze and Eagle Eye. Selection of products is based on the birds’ landing location and whether they’re nesting.

Check out the article article and video below!

The Flying Rat

It’s safe to say that humans and wild pigeons are not the best of friends. While there is a certain breed of pigeon bred for racing, and domesticated by humans, the pigeons perched on the side of your house, or walking along your balcony, are not that kind.

One unique thing about pigeons is that they are not afraid of humans. These birds thrive in human habitats. They can eat a wide array of food types, including human food which is why they have become so accustomed to human environments.

Since they enjoy human habitats so much, pigeons can pose a nuisance to both residential and business owners. Pigeons are known to transmit diseases and their droppings contain several threatening agents, including bacteria, fungi and even parasites. These agents can cause sicknesses similar to the flu, and potentially even worse!

Not only do these birds pose a health risk, but they are an immediate threat to your property. Their  droppings can build up a lot quicker than you would expect causing backed up drains or gutters. The uric acid found in their feces is also highly corrosive causing damage to buildings. They can erode wood, damage steel, destroy air conditioning units.  On top of that, they can present a situation in which humans may slip and fall.

The most effective method for deterring pigeons from your property is the 2″ StealthNet . StealthNet is a permenant solution as it is meant to completely seclude the area .

Another option is the Bird-Shock Flex-Track . This track emits a small, painless electrical shock to birds. It is a humane way of modifying the behavior of pigeons roosting on your property by conditioning them to not come back. It also has a sleek design that won’t take away from the aesthetics of your property.

Bird Spikes are another popular option as long as the birds aren’t nesting. The spike literally disables the birds from landing on the protected area. However, the spikes are dull enough that they cannot harm the birds.

Call 1(800)503-5444 for a consultation on products that will eliminate your pigeon problem. Or visit BirdBarrier.com and get all of the information you need as well as other options for your problem.

 

Attack of the 100 Foot Seagull

MSN9news reported that “giant” seagull invaded the studios of Channel 9 six o’clock news in Melbourne. The veteran newscaster, Peter Hitchner, was reading a story about a 1982 murder, when a “giant” seagull walked across the projection behind Hitchner, ultimately caused by a camera shooting a real-time cityscape of Melbourne. Hitchner, unphased by the seagull’s antics, continued his report.

“I was reading away, and it was a serious story, and I suddenly thought, ‘Oh my gosh that seagull’s back again’, because we had bit of a problem last night,” he told Melbourne radio after the bulletin.

“About 50 seconds to six o’clock this seagull arrived and started pecking at the camera and it had the beadiest huge eyes you’ve ever seen in your life.”