Bird Barrier America celebrates its 25th Anniversary

Bird Barrier America certainly has soared to the horizon and beyond since the company took flight in 1993. Back then, Bird Barrier offered just three products warehoused in a small facility in Redondo Beach, Calif. What a difference a quarter-century makes! Today, Bird Barrier America operates an expansive facility in Carson, Calif., and offers thousands of products and training programs for pest bird exclusion and related waste remediation, nest cleanup and structural damage repairs. Bird Barrier’s solutions cover:
• All core pest birds: crows, geese, grackles, gulls, pigeons, sparrows, starlings, swallows, turkey vultures, woodpeckers, etc.;
• All core bird-control types: netting, spikes, electrified tracks, traps, deterrents, repellents, etc.; and
• All core structure types: single- and multi-family homes, apartments, airports, parking structures, hotels and restaurants, health care facilities, airports, retail/offices, rooftops/HVAC systems, historic buildings, industrial complexes, etc.

The company’s three original products — the Bird Coil, Daddi Long Legs and Peacock — were invented and patented by Vic Chatten, a former U.S. Navy officer, deep-sea diver, and occasional stuntman for John Wayne. When tinkerer Chatten passed away about 15 years ago, his dream was lifted to new heights under the leadership of Cameron Riddell, Bird Barrier president and CEO, and Riddell’s friends Joe Bollinger and John Houghton, who purchased the patents. While two of Chatten’s original products remain solid sellers, the company has expanded its offering to include StealthNet exclusion netting and hardware, Bird-Flite Spikes, Bird-Shock Flex-Track, Eagle Eye, Tree-Shock, Dura-Spike, and Optical Gel and myriad other innovations. All of Bird Barrier’s products are humane: They simply repel pest birds, prompting them to move to other locations without hurting them. Case in point: Bird Barrier’s Bird-Shock carries an endorsement from the U.S. Humane Society.

Solutions = Products & Training
In 1994, Riddell approached pest control products distributor Univar (than named Van Waters & Rogers), and proposed a training program for its customers.

“Univar thought it was a great idea,” Riddell recalls. “Their representatives in offices around the U.S. invited local pest control operators for a two-day training class. We’d show up with boxes of tools and equipment, and a carousel of slides, and teach the group all about bird control.”

The first day featured classroom instruction, while the second day took the class out onto a real building where a bird problem was solved using Bird Barrier products. Bird Barrier continues to teach its class 24 years later, and many of the company’s largest customers to this day credit the class with their start in the business.

“Our mission is to have a long-lasting solution for every kind of bird problem,” Riddell says. “Since our start, we’ve focused on developing and delivering solutions that solve pest bird problems that could not be solved. We’re almost there. Today, there are very few pest bird problems that cannot be solved with Bird Barrier solutions.

“It’s hard to believe how fast the years have flown by,” Riddell adds. “I was just 30 when we started in a small shop with one box of product. Now I’m 55, my kids have almost flown the coop, and our and much-larger warehouse is busting at the seams. Time flies.”

Bird Barrier’s products and services can be found at its updated new website, www.birdbarrier.com

Seagulls in the winter?

With the cold weather approaching, you would think all birds would be flying south. Unfortunately, for a townhouse complex in Tinton Falls, New Jersey, hundreds, if not thousands of seagulls are flocking to the rooftops of the development. The town recently held a meeting to discuss the situation and how to resolve it.

“At least 25 residents came out to the Tinton Falls Borough Council meeting on Tuesday to relay to officials the scary details of trying to live their lives surrounded by the feathered interlopers, which includes feces-covered cars, patios and furniture and children unable to play outside,” reported Amy Brynes from the Eatontown-Tinton Falls Patch.

The situation has become so severe that the odor permeating from the bird droppings has caused the residents to shut their windows. The main source of the the seagull’s stay is the neighboring landfill and the Monmouth Regional Health Commission is doing everything they can to eliminate any type of food source.

“In a natural environment they are wonderful things,” a resident said of the gulls, “Here, they present a health hazard.”

Check out the article here!

Don’t Look Up!

In Jonesborough, Tennessee, the old Washington County courthouse is being plagued by none other than pigeons…and lots of them.

There are about 150-200 pigeons perching above the courthouse. Recently, the situation with the droppings has increasingly become worse, leaving the county to take steps of prevention.

“If this keeps on, somebody’s going to get sick,” said Jake Hensley, Washington County courthouse maintenance director.

The county has suffered with the pigeons and their droppings for nearly two decades. However, without effective bird control, the situation turned into a dangerous one.

Bird Barrier offers various products to help get rid of these birds such as Bird-Shock Flex Track, Bird Spikes, OvoControl, Avihaze and Eagle Eye. Selection of products is based on the birds’ landing location and whether they’re nesting.

Check out the article article and video below!

West Nile Virus

In Lomita, California a dead bird tested positive for the West Nile Virus. The disease has already been reported in 101 separate zip codes from dead birds to mosquitoes and chickens.

The West Nile Virus was brought back to our attention in September when more and more cases of the virus were being found in California.

Tip to keep yourself safe: Spray lots and lots of insect repellent!

Check out the article here

Bird Strikes Increasing as Fall Approaches

With fall approaching and the weather cooling down, don’t be surprised if you see more activity with birds migrating to warmer areas.

For pilots and airlines, this could be a huge problem as the number of bird strikes increase from 6,500 July to more than 9,000 in September and October.

However, it is not the larger birds that are causing the majority of the strike, but actually the smaller birds!

Check out the article here!